Al G. Barnes #7

Posted By on June 19, 2012

Here is a good example of how the horses were used to unload the flat cars. Photo 1935.

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Al G. Barnes #8

Posted By on June 19, 2012

Seen here are men setting the wagon wheel rails , also called wheel runs. The wheel rails or runs fastened to the back of the flat car bed. They sloped to the ground  to allow the wagon to be unloaded safely. On the ground a truck or horses would pull them to the lot.

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Al G. Barnes Circus #9

Posted By on June 19, 2012

Loaded cargo wagons. Photo 1936.

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Al G. Barnes Circus #10

Posted By on June 19, 2012

I believe this man could be the circus train master. Before the train was allowed to move to the next town, the loads had to be inspected, making sure all chains and pulleys were fastened correctly from the flat car to the wagons and trucks.

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Al G. Barnes Circus

Posted By on June 13, 2012

“HEY YOU KIDS GET OUT OF THERE!”

I don’t know how many times I have yelled these words. I bet some of you have done so as well. The above sentence is most likely used more often then any other in the circus vocabulary… Seen here are kids peeking and trying to pull back the safety doors for a better look.

The photo above reminded me of the following “Jackpot.”

In 1974 I was touring Mexico with the Suarez Bros Circus. We were playing a small town by the name of Zacaicas. The lot was typical of many we had played, dusty and of course the weather was hot. That morning I opened the back doors on the chimp truck allowing a slight breeze to enter. For safety reasons and security I ran a fence line around our equipment. I even went as far as having signs in Spanish saying, “Danger Keep Out.” This was effective till later in the afternoon when a man did not heed fence nor the warning signs. More than one time I had to run him out of our area, warning him in Spanish. I thought got my point across to him and went into the trailer for a cup of coffee.

So far so good, I thought. I looked though the trailer window and he was nowhere in sight. About 30 minutes later I went out to the chimp truck as it was watering time. I noticed while giving water to Boy, one of my larger chimps, was wearing a ring on his finger. Not just any ring but a gorgeous gold ring with a beautiful gem in the center. I tried to look closer at it, but Boy was reluctant to show me. He went back deeper into his compartment and turned his back to me. As I was trying to figure out where he got this ring, I heard voices behind me. I closed the door to Boy’s cage and looked over my shoulder and here was the same man that I had run off numerous times. This time, the man had with him what looked like the entire Mexican police force. The man was shouting to the police that he had been robbed of his ring and was pointing in my direction. One of the officers came forward and spoke to me asking if I had taken this man’s ring. I chuckled a little to myself and said, no but I know who did. I asked the police to quiet the man down and I opened the back doors to the chimp truck. As I opened the doors I could see Boy’s face and both of his hands  against the cage bars, sure enough the ring was on one of his fingers. The man started shouting “there it is…. see he took my ring’ and with that the police started to laugh and while they were laughing at him they gave him a few unpleasant looks.

It took about 6 or 7 bananas to bribe Boy to give me the ring. Boy was a little reluctant at first to give the ring up. Funny how a little banana bribery works. I asked the man how did the chimp get your ring. He had to tell the truth in front of the police. He said he went inside and sat on the floor near Boy’s cage door. He said he was scratching the monkeys back. The monkey turned around and he was looking at my hands. He liked my ring, so I took it off to show him… He would not give it back!  He didn’t know what to do, so  he got the police.

The man was lucky he got his ring back. The police could have arrested him for lying to them but did not, as I asked them not to.  Here is the kicker: one day before this event big bad Jackie, one of the toughest chimps was in that very same cage that Boy was in. I do not know to this day why I changed the two chimps over from cage to cage… It was fortunate that  I did.

Most animal men have had “Jackpots” similar to this.

Thanks Cappi for your comment, You are the best! Again I thank you for all those years of your loyal help with Henry Bros Circus and Legend City.

A (MUST) read comment made by Wade Burck.


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Barnes & Sells Floto Circus

Posted By on June 13, 2012

I have a date on this photo of 1937. I don’t know if the date is correct or not….. I will leave it up to Bob Cline to determine. This is a cage wagon with a middle separation.

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Al G. Barnes Circus

Posted By on June 13, 2012

Al G.Barnes cage wagon 1920. It is hard to see in this photo what animals are here. I think I previously posted this cage wagon in a parade exhibiting leopards.

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Al G. Barnes Circus

Posted By on June 13, 2012

Cage wagon loaded on a flat car.

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Al G. Barnes Circus

Posted By on June 13, 2012

This is another cage wagon 119 but this one has carved statues on the corners. This wagon maybe had been used for special animals. It definitely was used in parades. I wish I had a date on this wagon.

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Al G. Barnes Circus

Posted By on June 13, 2012

Cage wagon for pumas and leopards.

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